Military

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MILITARY HISTORICAL

Why and How the Ready Welder Came to Be a Reality.

Prior to the 20th Century wars were fought with mobile equipment drawn mainly by horses. The Cavalry meant literally that soldiers were moved by horses , and the Infantry was composed of foot soldiers. By the middle of the Century every fighting man in WWII had to move fast and mechanical equipment such as Jeeps, Tanks, Trucks and Ambulances were essential. When equipment for transporting men or supplies were damaged, it often became necessary to abandon the equipment unless a rare welding truck happened to be nearby.

What the Military needed in the latter part of the Century to repair field damage of metal parts, was a welder which was light weight, and hand portable with its own portable power. Ideally it would be a MIG type welder which was quite powerful and easy to operate, so that any mechanically inclined person could readily learn to operate it, and still do a good enough job so that a vehicle or even a Tank could be repaired, and make it back to its Base on it’s own power.

The problem was: There was nothing available anywhere answering to the above description. .We became aware of this, and in 1993 our engineers began to develop “Ready Welder II”. Ready Welder was developed by several different talented people. The outer design was drawn first. After the design was approved, then a 3 D model was made. Next, various configurations of circuitry, then “breadboard models” were completed. Finally in 1996 we had a working prototype! Production of units for field testing followed. Since 1997 we have been constantly making improvements until the Models being shipped are about as advanced as they can be.

Recently we learned that to use the Ready Welder on a Navy Vessel, it had to be equipped with a switch that turns the power off when the trigger is released. We have now developed a new Model 10000-MDPcs which fulfills this function. We have begun to take orders for shipment as of May 2004 . This switch is essential on ocean going Vessels, which are usually electrically grounded. Some Countries, for example, Canada, and some European Countries require these switches on all GMAW equipment. The Model # 10000cs Naval Pac is the title by which the Cold Switch unit may be ordered.

The Ready Welder II Model #10000-MDPcs Military Pac is most frequently bought and used by our military branches including the U.S. Coast Guard, as well as by military organizations worldwide because of its low cost, versatility, portability and durability. This model includes a NATO Slave Plug enabling the user to weld off of most military vehicles or maintenance trucks with their 24 volt battery system. This model comes in a durable, “Heavy Duty Storm Case” that is airtight and waterproof. The case also includes our AC to DC Power Converter, essential spare parts and other welding consumables, long extension cables, and other accessories. Please refer to the product page for additional features. The Ready Welder has been tested, passed and approved by the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force. Below are the essential GSA numbers:

GSA/NSN# 5130-01-522-1379
SC# 4940-95-B29
SECM# NS 4949-01-333-8471
CAGE CODE# 1SUS3

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The Founder of Ready Welder Corporation is a Veteran of World War II

Military Testimonials

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I couldn’t bear to part with the demo unit & actually
purchased it myself for my own personal use.

   “I am writing to inform you of my efforts to obtain support for implementing the Ready Welder II as an issue item for the U.S. Army Shop Equipment, Contact Maintenance (SECM) truck. After much evaluation & comparison with the equipment currently fielded with shop set, I am extremely impressed with your product. In fact, I am so impressed that I couldn’t bear to part with the demo unit & actually purchased it myself for my own personal use.

Particularly in the area of conducting repairs on heavy aluminum equipment the Ready Welder II out performs anything I have seen fielded in 21 years of military service. While not limited solely to welding aluminum (this thing also does a great job on stainless steel & carbon steel), I was in particular need of a system for heavy aluminum repair. As a U.S. Army Allied Trades Technician, I am responsible for returning combat weapon systems to a fully operational status when they become damaged. Army doctrine is to repair this equipment as far forward on the battlefield as possible in an expeditious manner. The simplicity of the Ready Welder II combined with its unique NATO slave receptacle power connection make it ‘hands down’ my choice for tactical situations.

I do have to admit to being extremely skeptical initially to the idea of a GMAW/FCAW welding device that draws its welding power from the 24-volt vehicle electrical system. When the situation is examined closer it become apparent that ‘conventional’ GMAW/FCAW equipment typically operates at voltages & amperage draw well within the confines of the military 24-volt electrical system. After conducting voltage drop & amperage draw tests myself with a multimeter & an inductive ammeter, I find the Ready Welder II to be well within the safe operating range of military vehicle batteries.

The elimination of the need for liners & rollers combined with a 50’ extension cord and packaged in a rugged Pelican case make for simple, efficient and truly durable equipment. On the modern battlefield a soldier’s equipment has got to be simple, effective and able to stand up to a beating. The Ready Welder II is proven to endure & perform in arduous conditions.

After careful evaluation the U.S. Army Tank and Automotive Command (TACOM) has found merit in the Ready Welder II as well. In response to my official suggestion number FCH0004163 the following is noted, ‘SC 4940-95-B29 will be changed via LIDB to reflect the addition of the Ready Welder II, NSN 5130-01-482-1692, to the SC with remarks code 16… The change to the SC will appear in the next CD-ROM of the consolidated Publication of Component Lists, EM 0074, that will be published in April 2002.’

To anyone looking for a simplistic, cost effective and rugged solution to field welding issues, I would say, ‘The Ready Welder II has proven itself from Bosnia to the Mojave Desert. It is exactly what is needed on the modern battlefield.’”

Wayne Glass
CW2, USA
Allied Trades Technician

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Evaluation of welder, READY WELDER II


1. The Iowa Army National Guard Evaluated the portable welder, the Ready Welder II, Model 10250 with plastic case, it it standard pack kit. It has been used in a welding shop and during field training exercises. we have used the Ready Welder for one year. The following comments were collected through interviews with the army soldiers that a chance to operate the Ready Welder.

2. The Device has proven to many of us that it could handle most or any task where an emergency weld is required. It is especially superior to any other method of welding in a combat zone.

3.The benefits of the Ready Welder follow:

a. The entire kit is 13 pounds and can be used anyplace where there is access to 12 – 48 Volts DC power.

b. This device can be adapted to any existing tool system that supports welding operations in the field. i.e. tactical wrecker truck Additional Authorized Items (AAI), M88 AAI, contact truck Basic Issue Items (BII) and the different battlefield Damage Assessment and Repair (BDAR) tool kits to name a few.

c. The infrequency of equipment used in the Reserve Component causes maintenance and training problems. Big welding sets require PMCS, operating training and qualification. Some of our Systems require a lot of training and there are also many safety concerns. The Ready Welder could solve the above problems.

This device can handle heavy duty welding on steel and aluminum with vehicle power and shows exceptional results.

Although the Ready Welder must be issued with a 50 foot extension lead to meet safety standards, teh device could literally replace those cumbersome, expensive system that currently have assigned for combat duty. That replacement should occur in my opinion.

Iowa Army National Guard
Camp Dodge

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    “Through my personal experience the Ready Welder II has been the absolute best portable MIG welder I have seen in the Army for the past 17½ years of my service. With the ability to use this type of spool gun hooked directly to my welding machines on the floor it would be an increased asset and great cost saver for me. We use the RWII on every MIG welding job in the field environment. My soldiers that work for me prefer to use the Ready Welder II for the quick easy jobs within the shops, therefore pulling a truck up to the bay doors. Being in Germany, I have another full size German MIG welder but they still insist on using the RWII spool gun. The RWII spool guns are so convenient and easy to use.”

CW2 William “Bill” Moore
C CO 701st MSB, 1st ID
Harvey Brks, Kitzengen Germany
Allied Trades Technician

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“I work with the US Army TACOM Material Testing Field Team out of Fort Hood, TX. We are currently in Germany fielding M1A1 AIM tanks to USAREUR.

I had the opportunity to order and receive one of the Ready Welder II through GSA. It is a great piece of equipment and fits our needs perfectly here in the fielding site where we don’t have a need for a full-scale welder but still have the occasional welding job to take care of. Its portability and ease of use makes it a must-have for maintenance operations ‘on-the-go’ like we are. Its ability to operate from any 24-volt source with the NATO adapter and its gasless capabilities make it a great tool for field units where space and flexibility are a must.

I would highly recommend the Ready Welder II to anyone who would appreciate these qualities!!”

“Victory Through Superior Firepower”
Thomas Langston
Site Chief, Material Fielding Team Europe
Grafenwoehr, Germany
DSN 474-4502

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“I’m writing in regards to your Ready Welder II for the military type vehicles. I was very relieved to have had the welder during our field exercise known as “Northern Edge.” Being in Alaska and traveling on roads that are far from perfect and with limited communications, having such a repair tool proved to be critical.

The first vehicle broke its idler arm on a HMMWV and was stranded til my wrecker came by and welded his pieces together. Normally I would have hooked up and pulled him in with a wrecker, but that would have left six people stranded in the cold with no way to move or keep warm. The weather can change so quickly in Alaska we go from field exercise to survivability in a matter of hours.

Next we broke an engine mount on a 5-ton tractor and were able to repair this mount using the Ready Welder II. I cannot say enough good things about this tool and I strongly recommend it to all units with wreckers and recovery assets.

If you never even use it, it’s worth the piece of mind knowing you can repair most any problem out there.

Thank you for such a wonderful tool. I look forward to using it in the future.

Chuck Johnson
CW2, USA
Maintenance Technician

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